Lexington's historic past has been so well preserved that it offers visitors a step back in time. The Stonewall Jackson House has been restored and refurbished with many of his possessions to become a museum of his life. There is also a restored garden and a gift shop. The Lee Chapel and Museum is located on the campus of Washington & Lee University. Built in 1867, it contains the family crypt, many personal belongings, and Lee's office, preserved as he left it in 1870. The George C. Marshall Museum and library is another popular attraction. The museum contains photomurals and numerous artifacts which are employed in depicting the life and times of General Marshall. The Virginia Military Institute Museum has Stonewall Jackson's horse, Little Sorrell, on display. The Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery is the site of a statue portraying General Jackson. Jackson himself, members of his family, a number of Lexington's leading statesmen, and more than 100 Confederate soldiers are buried in these walls. Cyrus H. McCormick's farm and workshop, just a few miles north of Lexington, is the site of his famous invention. McCormick created the mechanized reaper, thus revolutionizing American agricultural production.
  There are plenty of recreational activitives in Lexington. The Virginia Horse Center is nearly 400 acres of rolling foothills, offering horse shows, events, educational seminars, and even sales. The Goshen Pass is renowned for it's serene beauty and solitude. It is a three mile long mountain gorge, which offers white water canoeing, fishing, trails to hike, and picnic areas.


Lexington Visitor Center--106 E. Washington St., Lexington--540-463-3777

City of Lexington--300 E. Washington St., Lexington--540-462-3700

Main Street
Stonewall Jackson House



Washington & Lee University


Virginia Military Institute

City of Lexington